Water Features
Washburn Missouri

The Influence of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Garden Design

Influence Norman Invasion Anglo-Saxon Garden Design 75800617194.jpg Anglo-Saxons experienced incredible modifications to their day-to-day lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. The Normans were better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. Nonetheless the Normans had to pacify the overall territory before they could focus on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Castles were more standard constructions and often erected on blustery hills, where their tenants devoted both time and space to practicing offense and defense, while monasteries were considerable stone buildings, commonly located in the widest, most fertile hollows. Gardening, a peaceful occupation, was impracticable in these unproductive fortifications. The best specimen of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent today is Berkeley Castle. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstacle to assailants trying to dig under the castle walls. On one of these parapets is a scenic bowling green covered in grass and bordered by an aged hedge of yew that has been shaped into coarse battlements.

Water Delivery Strategies in Early Rome

Water Delivery Strategies Early Rome 207025070414862650.jpg Previous to 273, when the first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was made in Roma, residents who lived on hillsides had to go even further down to get their water from natural sources. When aqueducts or springs weren’t accessible, people dwelling at raised elevations turned to water removed from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. Starting in the sixteenth century, a newer approach was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean portions to supply water to Pincian Hill. The aqueduct’s channel was made accessible by pozzi, or manholes, that were added along its length when it was 1st created. The manholes made it easier to maintain the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to pull water from the aqueduct, as we discovered with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he bought the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. It appears that, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t adequate to satisfy his needs. To provide himself with a more effective system to obtain water, he had one of the manholes opened up, giving him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

Aspects of Outdoor Sculpture in Archaic Greece

The primitive Greeks manufactured the first freestanding statuary, an impressive achievement as most sculptures up until then had been reliefs cut into walls and pillars. Younger, ideal male or female (kore) Greeks were the subject matter of most of the sculptures, or kouros figures.Aspects Outdoor Sculpture Archaic Greece 057862912369871468.jpg The kouroi, considered by the Greeks to portray beauty, had one foot stretched out of a rigid forward-facing posture and the male statues were regularly unclothed, with a strong, strong physique. Life-sized versions of the kouroi appeared beginning in 650 BC. During the Archaic period, a big time of change, the Greeks were developing new sorts of government, expressions of art, and a greater awareness of people and cultures outside Greece. But in spite of the issues, the Greek civilization went on to progress, unabated.