Water Features
Shamokin Dam Pennsylvania

The Influence of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Garden Design

The introduction of the Normans in the latter half of the eleventh century significantly altered The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But before focusing on home-life or having the occasion to consider domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire society. Because of this, castles were cruder constructions than monasteries: Monasteries were frequently immense stone buildings located in the biggest and most fecund valleys, while castles were constructed on windy crests where their residents devoted time and space to tasks for offense and defense. Relaxing pursuits such as gardening were out of place in these destitute citadels. The purest example of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent today is Berkeley Castle.Influence Norman Conquest Anglo-Saxon Garden Design 207025070414862650.jpg It is said that the keep was created during William the Conqueror's time. A spacious terrace recommended for strolling and as a means to stop enemies from mining below the walls runs about the building. A picturesque bowling green, enveloped in grass and enclosed by battlements cut out of an ancient yew hedge, makes one of the terraces.

Public Water Fountains Lost to History

As originally developed, fountains were designed to be practical, guiding water from streams or reservoirs to the citizens of towns and settlements, where the water could be used for cooking food, cleaning, and drinking. A supply of water higher in elevation than the fountain was necessary to pressurize the flow and send water spraying from the fountain's nozzle, a system without equal until the later half of the nineteenth century. Typically used as memorials and commemorative structures, water fountains have impressed men and women from all over the globe throughout the centuries. Crude in style, the first water fountains did not appear much like contemporary fountains. The 1st recognized water fountain was a natural stone basin created that served as a container for drinking water and ceremonial functions. Stone basins are thought to have been first utilized around 2,000 BC. The very first civilizations that made use of fountains relied on gravity to force water through spigots. Situated near aqueducts or springs, the practical public water fountains supplied the local residents with fresh drinking water. Animals, Gods, and religious figures dominated the very early decorative Roman fountains, starting to show up in about 6 BC. The remarkable aqueducts of Rome supplied water to the incredible public fountains, many of which you can visit today.

The Origins Of Garden Fountains

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to supply drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.Origins Garden Fountains 076390034910305.jpg

The primary purpose of a fountain was originally strictly functional. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to supply potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Until the late nineteenth, century most water fountains functioned using gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a source of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Fountains were not only used as a water source for drinking water, but also to decorate homes and celebrate the designer who created it. Roman fountains usually depicted images of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages added fountains to their designs. Fountains played a considerable role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to laud their positions by adding decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for fresh, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental. The creation of special water effects and the recycling of water were two things made possible by replacing gravity with mechanical pumps.

Decorating city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the uses of modern-day fountains.