Water Features
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Public Water Fountains Found in Historical Documents

As initially developed, fountains were designed to be functional, directing water from streams or reservoirs to the residents of towns and settlements, where the water could be utilized for cooking food, cleaning, and drinking. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was needed to pressurize the flow and send water spraying from the fountain's nozzle, a technology without equal until the late nineteenth century. Striking and spectacular, prominent water fountains have been constructed as memorials in many civilizations. Simple in style, the 1st water fountains didn't look much like modern fountains. Designed for drinking water and ceremonial functions, the first fountains were basic carved stone basins. Rock basins as fountains have been discovered from 2000 B.C.. The first civilizations that utilized fountains relied on gravity to push water through spigots.Public Water Fountains Found Historical Documents 75800617194.jpg Drinking water was provided by public fountains, long before fountains became decorative public monuments, as striking as they are functional. Wildlife, Gods, and Spiritual figures dominated the very early decorative Roman fountains, beginning to show up in about 6 B.C.. A well-engineered system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public fountains supplied with fresh water.

Rome’s Early Water Delivery Systems

Rome’s Early Water Delivery Systems 207025070414862650.jpg Prior to 273, when the first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was constructed in Roma, residents who lived on hills had to travel even further down to gather their water from natural sources. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people dwelling at raised elevations turned to water drawn from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill through the subterranean channel of Acqua Vergine. The aqueduct’s channel was made attainable by pozzi, or manholes, that were situated along its length when it was initially designed. Although they were primarily planned to make it possible to service the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi began using the manholes to get water from the channel, opening when he purchased the property in 1543. The cistern he had built to obtain rainwater wasn’t sufficient to meet his water requirements. To give himself with a much more streamlined means to assemble water, he had one of the manholes opened, giving him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

The Father Of Rome's Water Feature Design

In Rome’s city center, there are countless easily recognized water features. Pretty much all of them were designed, conceived and built by one of the finest sculptors and designers of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Marks of his life's work are apparent throughout the streets of Rome simply because, in addition to his abilities as a fountain designer, he was also a city builder. To fully reveal their art, chiefly in the form of community water fountains and water features, Bernini's father, a distinguished Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son, and they eventually moved in the City of Rome. An diligent worker, the young Bernini received compliments and the backing of many popes and important designers.Father Rome's Water Feature Design 076390034910305.jpg At first he was well known for his sculpting skills. An authority in classic Greek engineering, he used this knowledge as a starting point and melded it seamlessly with Roman marble, most remarkably in the Vatican. He was affected by many a great artists, however, Michelangelo had the biggest impact on his work.