Water Features
Providence Utah

The Origins Of Wall Fountains

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to provide drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.Origins Wall Fountains 14774576666905.jpg

Pure practicality was the original role of fountains. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, via aqueducts or springs in the vicinity. Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water supply, including aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Artists thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and celebrate the designer responsible for creating it. The main materials used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners included fountains to create smaller depictions of the gardens of paradise. The fountains seen in the Gardens of Versailles were intended to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to exalt their positions by adding beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

The end of the 19th century saw the rise in usage of indoor plumbing to supply drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. The creation of special water effects and the recycling of water were 2 things made possible by replacing gravity with mechanical pumps.

Beautifying city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the purposes of modern-day fountains.

Contemporary Statues in Early Greece

Traditionally, most sculptors were paid by the temples to adorn the elaborate pillars and archways with renderings of the gods, but as the era came to a close it grew to be more accepted for sculptors to portray ordinary people as well because many Greeks had begun to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred. Portraiture, which would be accepted by the Romans upon their annexation of Greek civilization became conventional as well, and thriving families would at times commission a rendering of their forebears to be situated in immense familial tombs. The use of sculpture and other art forms differed through the many years of The Greek Classical period, a time of creative growth when the arts had more than one goal. Greek sculpture is probably enticing to us nowadays seeing that it was an avant-garde experiment in the historic world, so it doesn't matter whether or not its original purpose was religious zeal or artistic pleasure.