Water Features
Manchester New Hampshire

Anglo-Saxon Landscapes During the Norman Conquest

Anglo-Saxons experienced incredible changes to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. The Normans were better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. However the Normans had to pacify the overall territory before they could concentrate on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Castles were more standard constructions and often erected on blustery hills, where their tenants devoted both time and space to exercising offense and defense, while monasteries were large stone buildings, commonly positioned in the widest, most fruitful hollows. The serene method of gardening was impractical in these bleak bastions. Berkeley Castle, potentially the most uncorrupted model of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists in the present day.Anglo-Saxon Landscapes Norman Conquest 14774576666905.jpg The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time period. A significant terrace serves as a discouraging factor to invaders who would try to mine the walls of the building. A scenic bowling green, covered in grass and enclosed by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, makes one of the terraces.Outdoor Garden Fountain Engineers History 057862912369871468.jpg

Outdoor Garden Fountain Engineers Through History

Fountain designers were multi-talented people from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one. Leonardo da Vinci, a Renaissance artist, was celebrated as a ingenious master, inventor and scientific master. The forces of nature led him to research the qualities and motion of water, and due to his fascination, he methodically recorded his findings in his now celebrated notebooks. Transforming private villa configurations into ingenious water exhibits complete with symbolic meaning and natural wonder, early Italian water feature engineers coupled resourcefulness with hydraulic and gardening knowledge. Known for his incredible skill in archeology, architecture and garden creations, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, offered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. For the many estates close to Florence, other fountain creators were well versed in humanistic subjects and ancient scientific texts, masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water highlights and water jokes.

Water Delivery Strategies in Ancient Rome

With the manufacturing of the very first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, people who lived on the city’s foothills no longer had to depend strictly on naturally-occurring spring water for their demands.Water Delivery Strategies Ancient Rome 2479072229404673.jpg When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily accessible, people living at raised elevations turned to water removed from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill by way of the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. The aqueduct’s channel was made reachable by pozzi, or manholes, that were placed along its length when it was first created. During the some nine years he possessed the residential property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi used these manholes to take water from the channel in containers, though they were initially established for the goal of cleaning and servicing the aqueduct. Reportedly, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t sufficient to meet his needs. To give himself with a more practical way to gather water, he had one of the manholes opened up, giving him access to the aqueduct below his property.