Water Features
Cheshire Massachusetts

The Genesis Of Garden Fountains

The incredible architecture of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complement your home.

Originally, fountains only served a practical purpose. Inhabitants of urban areas, townships and small towns used them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash, which meant that fountains had to be connected to nearby aqueduct or spring. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains operated using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Acting as an element of decoration and celebration, fountains also supplied clean, fresh drinking water. Roman fountains often depicted imagery of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to mimic the gardens of paradise.Genesis Garden Fountains 2479072229404673.jpg Fountains enjoyed a significant role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains constructed to mark the arrival points of Roman aqueducts.

Urban fountains made at the end of the 19th century functioned only as decorative and celebratory adornments since indoor plumbing provided the essential drinking water. Impressive water effects and recycled water were made possible by switching the force of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains function mostly as decoration for open spaces, to honor individuals or events, and compliment entertainment and recreational activities.

Builders of the First Water Fountains

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-talented people, Exemplifying the Renaissance skilled artist as a innovative master, Leonardo da Vinci worked as an inventor and scientific guru. He systematically recorded his examinations in his now much celebrated notebooks about his investigations into the forces of nature and the qualities and movement of water.Builders First Water Fountains 14774576666905.jpg Transforming private villa configurations into ingenious water displays complete with symbolic meaning and natural wonder, early Italian water fountain creators coupled creativity with hydraulic and gardening expertise. Known for his virtuosity in archeology, design and garden design, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, provided the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. Well versed in humanistic subject areas as well as classical technical readings, other fountain creators were masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water functions and water jokes for the various properties near Florence.

The Godfather Of Roman Garden Water Fountains

Godfather Roman Garden Water Fountains 75800617194.jpg There are many celebrated water fountains in the city center of Rome. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th century planned, conceptualized and built virtually all of them. He was also a city designer, in addition to his skills as a water fountain engineer, and traces of his life's work are noticeable all through the streets of Rome. A celebrated Florentine sculptor, Bernini's father guided his young son, and they ultimately transferred to Rome to totally exhibit their artwork, mainly in the form of community water fountains and water fountains. An diligent worker, the young Bernini received praise and patronage of various popes and important artists. At the beginning he was recognized for his sculptural expertise. An expert in ancient Greek engineering, he used this knowledge as a platform and melded it flawlessly with Roman marble, most remarkably in the Vatican. Though many artists had an influence on his work, Michelangelo had the most profound effect.