Water Features
Cairo Nebraska

The Genesis Of Fountains

The amazing or decorative effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, in addition to delivering drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

Pure functionality was the original role of fountains. Water fountains were linked to a spring or aqueduct to supply potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Used until the 19th century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their source of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from gravity. Serving as an element of adornment and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water. Roman fountains usually depicted images of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to re-create the gardens of paradise.Genesis Fountains 076390034910305.jpg The fountains found in the Gardens of Versailles were supposed to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. To mark the entrance of the restored Roman aqueducts, the Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries commissioned the construction of baroque style fountains in the spot where the aqueducts entered the city of Rome

The end of the 19th century saw the increase in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to enable fountains to bring in clean water and allow for amazing water displays.

Modern-day fountains function mostly as decoration for public spaces, to honor individuals or events, and enhance entertainment and recreational events.

Aqueducts: The Solution to Rome's Water Challenges

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct founded in Rome, began supplying the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had counted on natural springs up till then. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole techniques obtainable at the time to supply water to locations of greater elevation. To provide water to Pincian Hill in the early 16th century, they employed the brand-new strategy of redirecting the flow from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. During its initial construction, pozzi (or manholes) were added at set intervals along the aqueduct’s channel. The manholes made it more straightforward to thoroughly clean the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to pull water from the aqueduct, as we witnessed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he operated the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. Though the cardinal also had a cistern to amass rainwater, it didn’t produce a sufficient amount of water. That is when he made the decision to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran underneath his property.