Water Features
Bozeman Montana

Where did Garden Water Fountains Begin?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complete your home.

From the beginning, outdoor fountains were simply there to serve as functional elements. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, from aqueducts or springs in the area. Up until the nineteenth, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water source, including aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains.Garden Water Fountains Begin? 076390034910305.jpg Designers thought of fountains as amazing additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and honor the artist responsible for creating it. Roman fountains often depicted images of animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks. Muslims and Moorish garden designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. The fountains found in the Gardens of Versailles were intended to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries manufactured baroque decorative fountains to glorify the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the spot where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for clean, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental. The introduction of unique water effects and the recycling of water were two things made possible by swapping gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains serve mostly as decoration for public spaces, to honor individuals or events, and compliment entertainment and recreational gatherings.

Anglo Saxon Gardens During the Norman Conquest

The introduction of the Normans in the second half of the eleventh century irreparably improved The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The Normans were better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. Still, home life, household architecture, and decoration were out of the question until the Normans taken over the general population. Because of this, castles were cruder structures than monasteries: Monasteries were usually important stone buildings located in the biggest and most fecund valleys, while castles were built on windy crests where their residents devoted time and space to tasks for offense and defense. The serene practice of gardening was impractical in these dreary bastions. Berkeley Castle is most likely the most intact model in existence today of the early Anglo-Norman form of architecture. The keep is rumored to have been conceived during the time of William the Conqueror. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an impediment to assailants intending to excavate under the castle walls. A picturesque bowling green, covered in grass and surrounded by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, forms one of the terraces.