Water Features
Baldwin New York

A Chronicle of Fountains

Himself a learned man, Pope Nicholas V headed the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 till 1455 and was responsible for the translation of hundreds of ancient texts from their original Greek into Latin.Chronicle Fountains 14774576666905.jpg He undertook the embellishment of Rome to turn it into the worthy capital of the Christian world. At the behest of the Pope, the Aqua Vergine, a damaged aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into Rome from eight miles away, was restored starting in 1453. The ancient Roman tradition of marking the arrival point of an aqueduct with an imposing celebratory fountain, also known as a mostra, was restored by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was directed by the Pope to put up a wall fountain where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had refurbished included modifications and extensions which eventually enabled it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the famed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

Anglo Saxon Grounds During the Norman Conquest

The arrival of the Normans in the second half of the 11th century irreparably transformed The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. Architecture and gardening were abilities that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. But yet there was no time for home life, domestic design, and decoration until the Normans had conquered the whole realm. Monasteries and castles served separate functions, so while monasteries were massive stone structures assembled in only the most fruitful, wide dales, castles were set upon blustery knolls where the people focused on learning offensive and defensive techniques. The barren fortresses did not provide for the quiet avocation of horticulture. Berkeley Castle, perhaps the most uncorrupted style of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists now. It is said that the keep was created during William the Conqueror's time.Anglo Saxon Grounds Norman Conquest 057862912369871468.jpg A big terrace intended for strolling and as a means to stop enemies from mining under the walls runs about the building. On one of these terraces sits a quaint bowling green: it is coated in grass and flanked by an old yew hedge that is created into the shape of rough ramparts.