The Countless Construction Materials of Outdoor Fountains

Though they come in different materials, today’s garden fountains tend to be made of metal. Metallic fountains, with their clean lines and sculptural accents, exist in in a variety of metals and can accommodate any style or budget. It is very important that your landscape reflects the style of your residence.

Today, many people favor copper for their sculptural garden fountains. Copper is used in cascade and tabletop water fountains as well as various other styles, making it versatile enough for inside and outside fountains. Another advantage of copper fountains is they are versatile and come in a wide range of styles.

If you are drawn to more conventional -looking water fountains, brass is probably for you. Even though they are a bit old-fashioned, brass fountains are quite common because they often incorporate interesting artwork.

Perhaps the most modern of all metals is stainless steel. A modern steel design will quickly boost the value of your garden as well as the feeling of peacefulness. As with all fountains, you can find any size you choose.

Because it is both lighter and more affordable than metal but has a comparable look, fiberglass is quite common for fountains. Keeping a fiberglass water fountain clean and working properly is quite effortless, another aspect consumers like.

Garden Water fountains: An Ideal Decor Accessory to Find Tranquility

Simply having water in your garden can have a significant effect on your health. The noises in your neighborhood and surrounding area will be masked with the tranquil sounds of a fountain. Consider this the place where can you go to relax and become one with nature. Considered a great rehabilitation element, many water therapies use big bodies of water such as seas, oceans and rivers in their treatments. Create the perfect haven for your body and mind and get yourself a fountain or pond today!

A Chronicle of Garden Water Fountains

The translation of hundreds of classical Greek documents into Latin was commissioned by the scholarly Pope Nicholas V who ruled the Church in Rome from 1397 till 1455. In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city. Restoration of the Acqua Vergine, a ruined Roman aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the behest of the Pope. The ancient Roman tradition of building an imposing commemorative fountain at the point where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was restored by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to put up a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. The Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains located in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona were eventually supplied with water from the modified aqueduct he had rebuilt.

Anglo Saxon Gardens at the Time of the Norman Conquest

Anglo-Saxons encountered incredible changes to their daily lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. Engineering and gardening were skills that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. But before concentrating on home-life or having the occasion to contemplate domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Most often designed upon windy summits, castles were basic constructs that permitted their inhabitants to spend time and space to offensive and defensive programs, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings commonly placed in only the most fecund, broad valleys. Tranquil pursuits such as gardening were out of place in these destitute citadels.Anglo Saxon Gardens Time Norman Conquest 057862912369871468.jpg The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is represented in Berkeley Castle, which is conceivably the most untouched illustration we have. The keep is thought to date from the time of William the Conqueror. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstacle to attackers attempting to excavate under the castle walls. On one of these parapets is a picturesque bowling green covered in grass and bordered by an aged hedge of yew that has been shaped into coarse battlements.

The Godfather Of Rome's Water Features

Godfather Rome's Water Features 057862912369871468.jpg In Rome’s city center, there are many famous water fountains. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the best sculptors and artists of the 17th century designed, created and constructed nearly all of them. Also a city designer, he had abilities as a water feature developer, and traces of his life's work are apparent throughout the roads of Rome. Ultimately moving to Rome to completely express their artwork, chiefly in the form of public water features, Bernini’s father, a renowned Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son. An exceptional employee, Bernin earned encouragement and the patronage of popes and important artists. He was initially recognized for his sculpture. An authority in ancient Greek engineering, he utilized this knowledge as a foundation and melded it seamlessly with Roman marble, most remarkably in the Vatican. He was affected by many great artists, however, Michelangelo had the biggest impact on his work.

Aqueducts: The Solution to Rome's Water Challenges

Prior to 273, when the very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was made in Rome, residents who dwelled on hills had to journey even further down to collect their water from natural sources. If people living at higher elevations did not have accessibility to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to count on the remaining existing systems of the day, cisterns that collected rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that drew the water from below ground. Starting in the sixteenth century, a newer strategy was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean segments to generate water to Pincian Hill. The aqueduct’s channel was made accessible by pozzi, or manholes, that were added along its length when it was first engineered.Aqueducts: Solution Rome's Water Challenges 75800617194.jpg The manholes made it easier to clean the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to extract water from the aqueduct, as we viewed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he bought the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he died. Though the cardinal also had a cistern to get rainwater, it didn’t produce a sufficient amount of water. That is when he decided to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran below his residential property.