Outdoor Garden Fountains Near Me
Rochester Pennsylvania

The Many Good Reasons to Add a Wall Fountain

Many Good Reasons Add Wall Fountain 75800617194.jpg A great way to enhance the look of your outdoor living area is to add a wall water feature or an exterior garden fountain to your landscaping or garden design. Contemporary artists and fountain builders alike use historic fountains and water features to shape their creations. Therefore, in order to link your home to earlier times, add one these in your decor. The advantage of having a garden fountain extends beyond its beauty as it also attracts birds and other wildlife, in addition to harmonizing the ecosystem with the water and moisture it releases into the atmosphere. For instance, irritating flying insects are usually discouraged by the birds drawn to the fountain or birdbath.

Putting in a wall water feature is your best option for a little garden because a spouting or cascading fountain occupies too much space. You can choose to set up a stand-alone fountain with a flat back and an attached basin propped against a fence or wall in your backyard, or a wall-mounted type which is self-contained and suspended from a wall. A water feature can be added to an existing wall if you include some kind of fountain mask as well as a basin to collect the water at the bottom. Be sure to employ a specialist for this type of job since it is better not to do it yourself due to the intricate plumbing and masonry work needed.Water Delivery Strategies Historic Rome 207025070414862650.jpg

Water Delivery Strategies in Historic Rome

Rome’s very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; before that, people living at higher elevations had to rely on local springs for their water. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone technological innovations obtainable at the time to supply water to spots of greater elevation. From the early sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill by way of the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. The aqueduct’s channel was made accessible by pozzi, or manholes, that were added along its length when it was first developed. During the roughly nine years he had the residential property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi made use of these manholes to take water from the channel in buckets, though they were actually built for the goal of cleaning and maintenance the aqueduct. The cistern he had made to gather rainwater wasn’t adequate to meet his water needs. Via an orifice to the aqueduct that flowed below his property, he was set to meet his water wants.

A Chronicle of Fountains

Hundreds of ancient Greek documents were translated into Latin under the authority of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. It was imperative for him to embellish the city of Rome to make it worthy of being called the capital of the Christian world. Starting in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent reconstruction at the behest of the Pope. The ancient Roman custom of building an awe-inspiring commemorative fountain at the point where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was revived by Nicholas V. At the bidding of the Pope, architect Leon Battista Alberti undertook the construction of a wall fountain in the spot where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had reconditioned included modifications and extensions which eventually allowed it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.