Outdoor Garden Fountains Near Me
Ravenna Michigan

The Origins Of Wall Fountains

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to provide drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Originally, fountains only served a functional purpose. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, via aqueducts or springs nearby. Used until the 19th century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their origin of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from gravity. Fountains were an excellent source of water, and also served to decorate living areas and celebrate the artist.Origins Wall Fountains 75800617194.jpg Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were commonly seen on Roman fountains. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to re-create the gardens of paradise. To show his prominence over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains made to mark the arrival points of Roman aqueducts.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby limiting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Impressive water effects and recycled water were made possible by switching the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Contemporary fountains are used to adorn community spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.

Acqua Vergine: The Solution to Rome's Water Problems

Rome’s very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; before that, residents residing at higher elevations had to rely on natural streams for their water. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole technological innovations obtainable at the time to supply water to locations of greater elevation.Acqua Vergine: Solution Rome's Water Problems 75800617194.jpg From the early sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill via the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. During the roughly nine years he owned the residential property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi used these manholes to take water from the network in buckets, though they were actually designed for the purpose of cleaning and maintaining the aqueduct. The cistern he had constructed to gather rainwater wasn’t satisfactory to meet his water requirements. Through an opening to the aqueduct that flowed below his property, he was able to reach his water wants.