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Architectural Statues Early Greece 207025070414862650.jpg

Architectural Statues in Early Greece

Nearly all sculptors were paid by the temples to accentuate the elaborate pillars and archways with renderings of the gods until the stage came to a close and many Greeks began to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred, when it became more typical for sculptors to represent ordinary people as well. Portraiture came to be widespread as well, and would be accepted by the Romans when they defeated the Greeks, and quite often affluent families would commission a representation of their progenitors to be put inside their grand familial tombs. A time of artistic enhancement, the use of sculpture and alternate art forms morphed through the Greek Classical period, so it is inaccurate to say that the arts served only one function. Greek sculpture is perhaps fascinating to us all at present as it was an avant-garde experiment in the historic world, so it does not matter whether its original purpose was religious zeal or artistic enjoyment.

Anglo-Saxon Landscapes During the Norman Conquest

The arrival of the Normans in the 2nd half of the eleventh century irreparably altered The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The Normans were better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. But before concentrating on home-life or having the occasion to consider domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire society. Monasteries and castles served separate purposes, so while monasteries were massive stone structures built in only the most productive, wide dales, castles were set upon blustery knolls where the people focused on learning offensive and defensive practices. Gardening, a peaceful occupation, was unfeasible in these fruitless fortifications. Berkeley Castle, perhaps the most uncorrupted style of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists in the present day. It is said that the keep was introduced during William the Conqueror's time. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstacle to attackers trying to excavate under the castle walls. A scenic bowling green, enveloped in grass and surrounded by battlements cut out of an ancient yew hedge, creates one of the terraces.