Outdoor Garden Fountains Near Me
Garfield New Mexico

Aqueducts: The Answer to Rome's Water Challenges

Previous to 273, when the very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was made in Rome, residents who lived on hills had to journey even further down to get their water from natural sources. When aqueducts or springs weren’t accessible, people dwelling at greater elevations turned to water removed from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. To furnish water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they employed the brand-new strategy of redirecting the stream from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. Pozzi, or manholes, were engineered at standard stretches along the aqueduct’s channel. The manholes made it easier to maintain the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to extract water from the aqueduct, as we viewed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he bought the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he died. Even though the cardinal also had a cistern to get rainwater, it couldn't supply enough water. Fortunately, the aqueduct sat below his residence, and he had a shaft established to give him access.Source Today's Outdoor Water Fountains 076390034910305.jpg

The Source of Today's Outdoor Water Fountains

Himself a learned man, Pope Nicholas V led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 till 1455 and was responsible for the translation of hundreds of ancient documents from their original Greek into Latin. He undertook the embellishment of Rome to make it into the worthy capital of the Christian world. Restoration of the Acqua Vergine, a desolate Roman aqueduct which had transported fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the behest of the Pope. A mostra, a monumental commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to mark the point of entry of an aqueduct, was a custom which was revived by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to put up a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. Changes and extensions, included in the restored aqueduct, eventually supplied the Trevi Fountain and the well-known baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona with the necessary water supply.