Outdoor Garden Fountains Near Me
Burton Ohio

Where did Garden Water Fountains Begin?

The dramatic or ornamental effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as delivering drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

From the onset, outdoor fountains were soley there to serve as functional elements. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, from aqueducts or springs in the vicinity. Up to the late nineteenth century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and higher than the fountain so that gravity could make the water flow downwards or jet high into the air. Fountains were an excellent source of water, and also served to decorate living areas and memorialize the designer. Roman fountains often depicted imagery of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller models of the gardens of paradise. The fountains found in the Gardens of Versailles were supposed to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains made to mark the arrival points of Roman aqueducts.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for clean, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental.Garden Water Fountains Begin? 2479072229404673.jpg The creation of unique water effects and the recycling of water were 2 things made possible by replacing gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains serve mostly as decoration for public spaces, to honor individuals or events, and enhance entertainment and recreational events.

Water Transport Strategies in Ancient Rome

Rome’s very first raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; before that, citizens residing at higher elevations had to rely on natural streams for their water. If residents residing at higher elevations did not have accessibility to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to depend on the remaining existing techniques of the time, cisterns that gathered rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from under ground. Starting in the sixteenth century, a brand new strategy was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean sections to deliver water to Pincian Hill. Pozzi, or manholes, were constructed at regular intervals along the aqueduct’s channel. The manholes made it less demanding to thoroughly clean the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we witnessed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he possessed the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. Despite the fact that the cardinal also had a cistern to collect rainwater, it didn’t provide sufficient water. Thankfully, the aqueduct sat directly below his residence, and he had a shaft opened to give him access.