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Inventors of the First Water Fountains

Frequently working as architects, sculptors, designers, engineers and cultivated scholars, all in one, fountain designers were multi-faceted people from the 16th to the late 18th century. Leonardo da Vinci as a inspired genius, inventor and scientific virtuoso exemplified this Renaissance artist. The forces of nature guided him to explore the qualities and movement of water, and due to his fascination, he systematically recorded his observations in his now famed notebooks. Early Italian fountain engineers changed private villa configurations into innovative water showcases full with emblematic meaning and natural elegance by coupling creativity with hydraulic and gardening experience. Known for his incredible skill in archeology, architecture and garden design, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, offered the vision behind the magnificence in Tivoli. For the various properties near Florence, other water feature creators were well versed in humanist themes as well as classical technical texts, masterminding the incredible water marbles, water attributes and water antics.Outcome Norman Conquest Anglo-Saxon Gardens 076390034910305.jpg

The Outcome of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Gardens

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was considerably changed by the appearance of the Normans in the later eleventh century. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But nevertheless home life, household architecture, and decoration were out of the question until the Normans taken over the entire population. Castles were more fundamental constructions and often erected on blustery hills, where their people devoted both time and space to exercising offense and defense, while monasteries were major stone buildings, regularly located in the widest, most fruitful hollows. The serene practice of gardening was unlikely in these bleak bastions. The purest example of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent presently is Berkeley Castle. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstruction to assailants attempting to excavate under the castle walls. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an ancient yew hedge trimmed into the form of crude battlements.Contemporary Statues Ancient Greece 076390034910305.jpg

Contemporary Statues in Ancient Greece

A good number of sculptors were remunerated by the temples to enhance the intricate pillars and archways with renderings of the gods right up until the time period came to a close and countless Greeks began to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred, when it became more typical for sculptors to portray everyday people as well. Affluent families would often times commission a rendering of their forefathers for their large family tombs; portraiture also became prevalent and would be appropriated by the Romans upon their acquisition of Greek civilization. A point of aesthetic development, the use of sculpture and other art forms transformed during the Greek Classical period, so it is inexact to say that the arts served only one function. Whether to satisfy a visual yearning or to celebrate the figures of religion, Greek sculpture was actually an innovative practice in the ancient world, which could be what draws our interest today.

The First Garden Water Features

First Garden Water Features 207025070414862650.jpg As originally conceived, water fountains were crafted to be practical, directing water from streams or aqueducts to the residents of cities and villages, where the water could be utilized for cooking, washing, and drinking. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was required to pressurize the flow and send water squirting from the fountain's spout, a system without equal until the later half of the nineteenth century. Striking and spectacular, big water fountains have been designed as memorials in many civilizations. The common fountains of today bear little likeness to the first water fountains. A stone basin, carved from rock, was the first fountain, utilized for containing water for drinking and religious functions. Natural stone basins are thought to have been first used around 2000 BC. The first fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to manipulate the circulation of water through the fountain. Drinking water was provided by public fountains, long before fountains became elaborate public monuments, as attractive as they are functional. Fountains with flowery decoration started to show up in Rome in approx. 6 BC, usually gods and animals, made with stone or copper-base alloy. A well-designed system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public fountains supplied with fresh water.