The Effect of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Garden Design

The arrival of the Normans in the 2nd half of the eleventh century irreparably transformed The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The skill of the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons' in architecture and agriculture at the time of the conquest. But the Normans had to pacify the overall territory before they could concentrate on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Because of this, castles were cruder buildings than monasteries: Monasteries were frequently important stone buildings set in the biggest and most fertile valleys, while castles were constructed on windy crests where their citizens dedicated time and space to projects for offense and defense.Effect Norman Invasion Anglo-Saxon Garden Design 207025070414862650.jpg Relaxing pursuits such as gardening were out of place in these desolate citadels. Berkeley Castle is probably the most complete model in existence today of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture. The keep is reported to have been invented during the time of William the Conqueror. A significant terrace serves as a deterrent to invaders who would try to mine the walls of the building. A scenic bowling green, covered in grass and surrounded by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, forms one of the terraces.

Outdoor Fountains: The Perfect Decor Accessory to Find Tranquility

Your state of mind is favorably influenced by having water in your yard. The trickling sounds coming from your fountain can be helpful in masking any bothersome sounds in your surroundings. This is a place where you can entertain yourself and enjoy nature. Bodies of water such as seas, oceans and rivers are commonly used in water therapies, as they are considered therapeutic. If what you seek out is a calming place where you can take your body and your mind to a faraway place, put in a pond or fountain in your garden.

Acqua Vergine: The Answer to Rome's Water Challenges

Acqua Vergine: Answer Rome's Water Challenges 75800617194.jpg With the construction of the very first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, folks who lived on the city’s hills no longer had to depend exclusively on naturally-occurring spring water for their requirements. If citizens residing at higher elevations did not have accessibility to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to depend on the remaining existing techniques of the time, cisterns that collected rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from below ground. From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill via the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. Through its initial construction, pozzi (or manholes) were installed at set intervals alongside the aqueduct’s channel. While these manholes were provided to make it less difficult to maintain the aqueduct, it was also feasible to use containers to pull water from the channel, which was employed by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he obtained the property in 1543 to his passing in 1552. He didn’t get adequate water from the cistern that he had established on his property to obtain rainwater. By using an opening to the aqueduct that flowed underneath his property, he was in a position to suit his water desires.