The Origins Of Wall Fountains

The dramatic or ornamental effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as supplying drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

From the onset, outdoor fountains were simply meant to serve as functional elements. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with drinking water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains operated using gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Fountains were not only used as a water source for drinking water, but also to adorn homes and celebrate the artist who created it. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often times utilized by Romans to decorate their fountains. Muslims and Moorish garden designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. To mark the entrance of the restored Roman aqueducts, the Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries commissioned the construction of baroque style fountains in the spot where the aqueducts entered the city of Rome

Indoor plumbing became the main source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby limiting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity allowed fountains to bring recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

Modern-day fountains function mostly as decoration for public spaces, to honor individuals or events, and enhance entertainment and recreational gatherings.

Keep Your Fountain Clean

Keep Fountain Clean 207025070414862650.jpg It is essential to carefully maintain water fountains for them to perform optimally. Leaves, twigs, and bugs often find their way into fountains, so it is vital to keep yours free from such things. Additionally, anywhere light from the sun mixes with still water, algae can form. Blend hydrogen peroxide, sea salt, or vinegar into the water to avoid this particular issue. Another option is to blend bleach into the water, but this action can sicken wild animals and so should really be avoided.

An extensive cleaning every three-four months is ideal for garden fountains. The initial task is to get rid of all of the water. When you have done this, scour inside the water reservoir with a gentle detergent. If there is delicate artwork, you might need to use a toothbrush for those hard-to-reach areas. Any soap residue remaining on your fountain can harm it, so be sure it is all rinsed off.

Numerous organisms and calcium deposits can get inside the pump, so it is recommended to take it apart and clean it thoroughly. To make it less challenging, soak it in vinegar overnight before cleaning. Build-up can be a big hassle, so use mineral or rain water over tap water, when possible, to prevent this dilemma.

And finally, make sure the water level is continuously full in order to keep your fountain running smoothly. Allowing the water level to get too low can cause damage to the pump - and you certainly don't want that!