The Root of Modern Outdoor Wall Fountains

Root Modern Outdoor Wall Fountains 057862912369871468.jpg Hundreds of classic Greek records were translated into Latin under the auspices of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city. At the bidding of the Pope, the Aqua Vergine, a ruined aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into Rome from eight miles away, was renovated starting in 1453. The ancient Roman tradition of marking the entry point of an aqueduct with an imposing celebratory fountain, also known as a mostra, was restored by Nicholas V. The Trevi Fountain now occupies the space formerly filled with a wall fountain built by Leon Battista Albert, an architect employed by the Pope. Changes and extensions, included in the restored aqueduct, eventually provided the Trevi Fountain and the well-known baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona with the necessary water supply.

Anglo-Saxon Grounds at the Time of the Norman Conquest

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was significantly changed by the introduction of the Normans in the later eleventh century. Architecture and horticulture were attributes that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. But before focusing on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population.Anglo-Saxon Grounds Time Norman Conquest 75800617194.jpg Castles were more fundamental constructions and often erected on blustery hills, where their tenants devoted both time and space to exercising offense and defense, while monasteries were considerable stone buildings, mostly positioned in the widest, most fertile hollows. Relaxing pursuits such as gardening were out of place in these destitute citadels. Berkeley Castle, potentially the most pristine model of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists in the present day. The keep is said to date from the time of William the Conqueror. As a strategy of deterring attackers from tunneling underneath the walls, an immense terrace encompasses the building. On one of these parapets is a scenic bowling green covered in grass and surrounded by an aged hedge of yew that has been shaped into coarse battlements.