The Godfather Of Roman Water Fountains

In Rome’s city center, there are countless famous fountains. Nearly all of them were planned, architected and built by one of the finest sculptors and artists of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. He was additionally a city designer, in addition to his abilities as a water feature designer, and traces of his life's work are apparent throughout the streets of Rome. Bernini's father, a celebrated Florentine sculptor, guided his young son, and they ultimately settled in Rome, to thoroughly express their art in the form of community water features and water fountains. An diligent worker, the young Bernini earned praise and patronage of various popes and influential designers.Godfather Roman Water Fountains 75800617194.jpg Originally he was renowned for his sculpting skills. Most famously in the Vatican, he made use of a base of expertise in historical Greek architecture and melded it effortlessly with Roman marble. Though many artists impacted his artistic endeavors, Michelangelo inspired him the most.

Acqua Vergine: The Answer to Rome's Water Problems

With the construction of the first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, folks who lived on the city’s foothills no longer had to be dependent strictly on naturally-occurring spring water for their needs. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone technologies readily available at the time to supply water to spots of greater elevation. Starting in the sixteenth century, a unique strategy was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean segments to deliver water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals.Acqua Vergine: Answer Rome's Water Problems 2479072229404673.jpg The manholes made it easier to maintain the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we discovered with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he bought the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. The cistern he had built to obtain rainwater wasn’t adequate to meet his water requirements. Fortunately, the aqueduct sat under his residence, and he had a shaft opened to give him access.