Builders of the First Garden Fountains

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted people, Leonardo da Vinci as a innovative genius, inventor and scientific virtuoso exemplified this Renaissance creator. He methodically recorded his observations in his now famed notebooks about his research into the forces of nature and the properties and movement of water. Innovative water displays packed with symbolic meaning and natural wonder converted private villa settings when early Italian fountain designers combined creativity with hydraulic and landscaping skill. The splendors in Tivoli were created by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was renowned for his skill in archeology, engineering and garden design. Other fountain developers, masterminding the fantastic water marbles, water functions and water humor for the countless properties near Florence, were well-versed in humanistic topics and traditional scientific readings.

Water Transport Solutions in Historic Rome

Previous to 273, when the very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was established in Rome, citizens who dwelled on hillsides had to travel even further down to get their water from natural sources. When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily accessible, people living at raised elevations turned to water removed from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. To supply water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they employed the new approach of redirecting the motion from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. All through the length of the aqueduct’s passage were pozzi, or manholes, that gave entry. Whilst these manholes were developed to make it less difficult to conserve the aqueduct, it was also possible to use containers to pull water from the channel, which was done by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he acquired the property in 1543 to his passing in 1552.Water Transport Solutions Historic Rome 2479072229404673.jpg The cistern he had built to obtain rainwater wasn’t satisfactory to meet his water needs. Fortunately, the aqueduct sat below his property, and he had a shaft established to give him access.