At What Point Did Water Fountains Originate?

Hundreds of classic Greek texts were translated into Latin under the authority of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. In order to make Rome deserving of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to embellish the beauty of the city. Restoration of the Acqua Vergine, a ruined Roman aqueduct which had transported fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the bidding of the Pope. The ancient Roman custom of building an imposing commemorative fountain at the location where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was resurrected by Nicholas V. The present-day site of the Trevi Fountain was previously occupied by a wall fountain commissioned by the Pope and constructed by the architect Leon Battista Alberti.Point Water Fountains Originate? 75800617194.jpg The aqueduct he had reconditioned included modifications and extensions which eventually allowed it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the famed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

The Father Of Rome's Garden Fountain Design And Style

Father Rome's Garden Fountain Design Style 057862912369871468.jpg There are any number of celebrated Roman water fountains in its city center. Pretty much all of them were designed, designed and constructed by one of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. His skills as a fountain developer and also as a city architect, are evident all through the streets of Rome. To totally exhibit their artwork, primarily in the form of community water features and water fountains, Bernini's father, a distinguished Florentine sculptor, guided his young son, and they ultimately moved in the City of Rome. The young Bernini received compliments from Popes and relevant artists alike, and was an diligent worker. Originally he was renowned for his sculpting skills. An expert in historical Greek engineering, he used this knowledge as a base and melded it gracefully with Roman marble, most remarkably in the Vatican. Though he was influenced by many, Michelangelo had the most serious effect on him, both personally and professionally.