Rome’s Early Water Delivery Solutions

With the building of the 1st raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, individuals who lived on the city’s hillsides no longer had to depend strictly on naturally-occurring spring water for their demands. If inhabitants residing at higher elevations did not have accessibility to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to count on the remaining existing techniques of the time, cisterns that gathered rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from under ground.Rome’s Early Water Delivery Solutions 057862912369871468.jpg To deliver water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they implemented the brand-new technique of redirecting the stream from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground network. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. Whilst these manholes were developed to make it less difficult to protect the aqueduct, it was also possible to use containers to remove water from the channel, which was employed by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he acquired the property in 1543 to his passing in 1552. Despite the fact that the cardinal also had a cistern to amass rainwater, it didn’t provide enough water. By using an opening to the aqueduct that flowed below his property, he was set to satisfy his water needs.Keeping Large Outdoor Fountain Clean 75800617194.jpg

Keeping Your Large Outdoor Fountain Clean

Water fountains will keep working a long time with regular cleaning and maintenance. It is easy for foreign objects to find their way into outside fountains, so keeping it clean is essential. Additionally, anywhere light from the sun comes in contact with still water, algae can develop. Either sea salt, hydrogen peroxide, or vinegar can be dissolved into the water to eliminate this problem. There are those who prefer to use bleach, but that is dangerous to any animals that might drink or bathe in the water - so should therefore be avoided.

A thorough cleaning every three-four months is recommended for garden fountains. First off you must drain the water. Once it is empty, wash inside the reservoir with a gentle cleanser. A useful tip is to use a toothbrush if there are tiny hard-to-reach spots. Make sure all the soap is totally rinsed off.

Calcium and fresh water organisms could get inside the pump, so you should disassemble it to get it truly clean. Letting it soak in vinegar for a few hours first will make it much easier to clean. Neither rain water nor mineral water contain components that will accumulate inside the pump, so use either over tap water if possible.

One final tip for keeping your fountain in top working shape is to check the water level every day and make sure it is full. Low water levels can ruin the pump - and you do not want that!