Installation and Maintenance of Large Outdoor Fountains

Installation Maintenance Large Outdoor Fountains 057862912369871468.jpg A very important first step is to think about the size of the outdoor wall fountain with regards to the space you have available for it. In order to support its total weight, a solid wall is required. Areas or walls that are small will require a lightweight fountain. An electric socket near the fountain is required to power the fountain. Since there are many types of outdoor wall fountains, installation methods vary, but the majority include user-friendly instructions.

The general outdoor wall feature is available in an easy-to-use kit that comes with everything you need and more to properly install it. The kit will contain a submersible pump, the hoses and basin (or reservoir). The basin can typically be concealed among your garden plants if it is not too large. Once installed, wall fountains typically only need to have some light maintenance and regular cleaning.

Replenish and clean the water on a regular schedule. Remember to remove debris like leaves, twigs or dirt as fast as possible. Extremely cold temperatures can affect your outdoor wall fountain so be sure to protect it during winer. If left outdoors, your pump could break as a result of frigid water, so bring it inside during the winter. Simply put, your outdoor fountain will be a part of your life for many years to come with the correct care and maintenance.

Original Water Supply Solutions in Rome

Original Water Supply Solutions Rome 75800617194.jpg Rome’s very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants residing at higher elevations had to depend on local springs for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people living at greater elevations turned to water drawn from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. In the early 16th century, the city began to utilize the water that flowed below ground through Acqua Vergine to deliver drinking water to Pincian Hill. During the length of the aqueduct’s route were pozzi, or manholes, that gave access. The manholes made it more straightforward to clean the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we witnessed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he possessed the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. Though the cardinal also had a cistern to collect rainwater, it couldn't produce a sufficient amount of water. That is when he made the decision to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran underneath his property.