Anglo Saxon Gardens Norman Conquest 75800617194.jpg

Anglo Saxon Gardens During the Norman Conquest

Anglo-Saxons encountered great changes to their day-to-day lives in the latter half of the eleventh century due to the accession of the Normans. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. Still, home life, household architecture, and decoration were out of the question until the Normans taken over the entire population. Monasteries and castles served different functions, so while monasteries were large stone structures constructed in only the most productive, wide dales, castles were set upon blustery knolls where the occupants focused on understanding offensive and defensive practices. Gardening, a placid occupation, was unfeasible in these unproductive fortifications. The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is portrayed in Berkeley Castle, which is most likely the most unscathed example we have. It is said that the keep was created during William the Conqueror's time. As a strategy of deterring attackers from tunneling underneath the walls, an immense terrace encompasses the building. A scenic bowling green, covered in grass and surrounded by battlements cut out of an ancient yew hedge, makes one of the terraces.

The Public Fountains

Public Fountains 076390034910305.jpg As initially conceived, fountains were designed to be functional, directing water from streams or aqueducts to the citizens of towns and settlements, where the water could be used for cooking, cleaning, and drinking. In the days before electric power, the spray of fountains was driven by gravity only, commonly using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the nearby hills. The splendor and wonder of fountains make them ideal for historic memorials. Rough in design, the 1st water fountains did not look much like contemporary fountains. A stone basin, crafted from rock, was the first fountain, used for holding water for drinking and ceremonial functions. Rock basins as fountains have been discovered from 2000 B.C.. The first civilizations that made use of fountains depended on gravity to force water through spigots. These original water fountains were designed to be functional, frequently situated along aqueducts, streams and rivers to provide drinking water. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological beasts, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 B.C., built from natural stone and bronze. The impressive aqueducts of Rome provided water to the spectacular public fountains, most of which you can visit today.

The Source of Modern Outdoor Water Fountains

The translation of hundreds of ancient Greek texts into Latin was commissioned by the learned Pope Nicholas V who led the Church in Rome from 1397 till 1455. Beautifying Rome and making it the worthy capital of the Christian world was at the core of his ambitions. Restoration of the Acqua Vergine, a ruined Roman aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the bidding of the Pope.Source Modern Outdoor Water Fountains 75800617194.jpg A mostra, a monumental commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to mark the point of arrival of an aqueduct, was a practice which was restored by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to construct a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. The water which eventually supplied the Trevi Fountain as well as the acclaimed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona came from the modified aqueduct which he had renovated.